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Rare benign tumors hold the 'genetic recipe' to combat diabetes

THERAPIE / VOM NETZ / 2017-10-03
 

Researchers discover that insulinomas contain novel molecular pathways and reveal the map to regenerate insulin-producing cells.

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Blood test can predict early lung cancer prognosis

THERAPIE / VOM NETZ / 2017-08-30
 

Cancer cells obtained from a blood test may be able to predict how early-stage lung cancer patients will fare, a team of researchers has shown.

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New way found to boost immunity in fight cancer and infections

THERAPIE / VOM NETZ / 2017-07-19
 

A research team has identified a key new mechanism that regulates the ability of T-cells of the immune system to react against foreign antigens and cancer.

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Trigger for autoimmune disease identified

THERAPIE / VOM NETZ / 2017-05-10
 

Researchers have identified a trigger for autoimmune diseases such as lupus, Crohn's disease and multiple sclerosis. The findings help explain why women suffer autoimmune disease more frequently than men, and suggest a therapeutic target to prevent autoimmune disease in humans.

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Researchers make major brain repair discovery in fight against Multiple Sclerosis

WISSENSCHAFT / VOM NETZ / 2017-03-14
 

Scientists have discovered that specific cells from the immune system are key players in brain repair – a fundamental breakthrough that could revolutionize the treatment of debilitating neurological disorders such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

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New way of visualizing fatty acids inside cells

WISSENSCHAFT / VOM NETZ / 2017-02-02
 

A new method to image intracellular fatty acids at a single cell level has been developed by a team of researchers. They treated cells with fatty acids containing a single bromine atom and used scanning X-ray fluorescence microscopy to observe the molecules inside the cells. The technique offers superior resolution. The new method may improve understanding of the role of fatty acids in cell function and disease.

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Computer models could help design physical therapy regimens

PRÄVENTION / VOM NETZ / 2017-01-10
 

Researchers have developed a computational walking model that could help guide patients to their best possible recovery after a stroke.

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Social anxiety disorders? Cognitive therapy most effective treatment

PSYCHIATRIE / VOM NETZ / 2016-12-16
 

Social phobia is the most common anxiety disorder of our time. But the current treatment regimen for patients with this diagnosis has not proven very effective. Researchers spent 10 years studying alternative treatments to find that cognitive therapy works best for social anxiety disorders.

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Women catching up to men in alcohol consumption

ERNÄHRUNG / VOM NETZ / 2016-10-25
 

New research shows women are closing the gender gap on alcohol-related health problems

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Exercise may reduce alcohol-related cancer risk

ÜBUNGEN / VOM NETZ / 2016-09-16
 

Getting regular moderate or vigorous exercise may offset some of the potentially lethal health effects of regular alcohol consumption, a new study suggests.

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Face changing technology showing sun damage is most effective at promoting sun safe behavior

WISSENSCHAFT / VOM NETZ / 2016-08-18
 

Researchers examined the way sun safe messages are conveyed to young women, and found that visual communication using technology to age participant's faces to emphasis sun damage and premature aging is most effective.

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Exercise improves memory in breast cancer survivors

THERAPIE / VOM NETZ / 2016-07-08
 

Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity is related to improved subjective memory in breast cancer survivors, who often complain about memory problems, reports a new study. It appears the physical activity alleviates stress and benefits women psychologically, which in turn aids their memory. Memory problems appear to be related to the high stress load cancer survivors experience, and may not be specific to chemotherapy or radiation treatments.

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Heart attack 'bruising' clue uncovered

THERAPIE / VOM NETZ / 2016-06-08
 

Researchers say they have found a new way to tell if a heart attack is more severe and might cause lasting harm - by looking for bruising or bleeding in the heart muscle.

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Blood pressure patterns may predict stroke risk

THERAPIE / VOM NETZ / 2016-05-10
 

Overall patterns may be a more reliable predictor than individual blood pressure readings, new research suggests.

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Are vegetable oils really healthier for your heart?

ERNÄHRUNG / VOM NETZ / 2016-04-13
 

Butter vs. vegetable oil: A new study raises questions about some common dietary advice

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'Cold turkey' best way to quit smoking

PRÄVENTION / VOM NETZ / 2016-03-15
 

People who want to quit smoking are being advised that stopping abruptly by going 'cold turkey' is the best way to succeed, a study shows.

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Blocking transfer of calcium to cell's powerhouse selectively kills cancer cells

WISSENSCHAFT / VOM NETZ / 2016-03-04
 

Inhibiting the transfer of calcium ions into the cell's powerhouse is specifically toxic to cancer cells, suggesting new ways to fight the disease. Calcium addiction by mitochondria is a novel feature of cancer cells. This unexpected dependency on calcium transfer to the mitochondria for the survival of cancer cells surprised the researchers.

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Could a bacteria-killing protein lead to a new treatment for diabetes?

DIABETES / VOM NETZ / 2016-02-24
 

Why would a bacteria-killing protein be present in an area of the body that is not normally exposed to bacteria, like the pancreas? Researchers puzzled over this question for some time, until they eventually discovered that the protein in question was doing something entirely unexpected -- it was actually helping the pancreas regenerate and produce insulin. This ground-breaking discovery could lead to new treatments for diabetes.

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What goes wrong in the brain when someone can't spell

WISSENSCHAFT / VOM NETZ / 2016-02-03
 

By studying stroke victims who have lost the ability to spell, researchers have pinpointed the parts of the brain that control how we write words.

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Important associations between genetics, sleep behavior identified by study

SCHLAF / VOM NETZ / 2016-01-14
 

A research initiative exploring the utility of genetic information in the clinical setting has published a study and identified six noteworthy genes that affect human sleep duration. The focus of the paper was to identify the genes associated with sleep duration and validate the connection between sleep and several demographic and lifestyle factors, including age, gender, weight, ethnicity, exercise, smoking and alcohol.

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Sugars in Western diets increase risk for breast cancer tumors and metastasis

ERNÄHRUNG / VOM NETZ / 2016-01-04
 

The high amounts of dietary sugar in the typical western diet may increase the risk of breast cancer and metastasis to the lungs, according to a new study.

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Emotion processing in brain changes with tinnitus severity

WISSENSCHAFT / VOM NETZ / 2015-12-15
 

People with tinnitus who are less bothered by their symptoms use different brain regions when processing emotional information, new research indicates. Tinnitus, otherwise known as ringing in the ears, affects nearly one-third of adults over age 65.

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Breast screening program found to be effective in preventing some invasive cancers

THERAPIE / VOM NETZ / 2015-12-05
 

Screening for and treatment of an early form of breast cancer has been found to prevent subsequent invasive cancer, according to new research.

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Health benefits from lowering blood pressure

THERAPIE / VOM NETZ / 2015-11-10
 

New details are out from a landmark study that found patients benefit from lowering blood pressure more than previously recommended.

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Signs of faster aging process identified through gene research

WISSENSCHAFT / VOM NETZ / 2015-10-26
 

New research has shed light on the molecular changes that occur in our bodies as we age. In the largest study of its kind, an international group of researchers examined expression of genes in blood samples from 15,000 people across the world. They found 1,450 genes that are linked to aging, and also uncovered a link between these genes and factors such as diet, smoking and exercise.

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Gut bacteria that 'talk' to human cells may lead to new treatments

WISSENSCHAFT / VOM NETZ / 2017-08-30
 

Scientists developed a method to genetically engineer gut bacteria to produce molecules that have the potential to treat certain disorders by altering human metabolism.

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Mental health programs in schools: Growing body of evidence supports effectiveness

PRÄVENTION / VOM NETZ / 2017-08-10
 

School-based mental health programs can reach large numbers of children, with increasing evidence of effectiveness in improving mental health and related outcomes, according to a research review/

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Healthy diet? That depends on your genes

ERNÄHRUNG / VOM NETZ / 2017-06-12
 

Shifts in the diets of Europeans after the introduction of farming 10,000 years ago led to genetic adaptations that favored the dietary trends of the time, new research indicates. The study has implications for the growing field of nutritional genomics, called nutrigenomics. Based on one's ancestry, clinicians may one day tailor each person's diet to her or his genome to improve health and prevent disease.

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Twin research reveals which facial features are most controlled by genetics

WISSENSCHAFT / VOM NETZ / 2017-04-19
 

Research uses computer image and statistical shape analysis to shed light on which parts of the face are most likely to be inherited. The study examined 3-D face models of nearly 1,000 UK female twins, and found that the shapes of the end of the nose, the area above and below the lips, cheekbones and the inner corner of the eye were highly influenced by genetics.

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Gene variants associated with body shape increase risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes

DIABETES / VOM NETZ / 2017-02-15
 

A study has found that a pattern of gene variants associated with a body type, in which weight is deposited around the abdomen, rather than in the hips and thighs, increases the risk for type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease, as well as the incidence of several cardiovascular risk factors.

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Brain activity 'key in stress link to heart disease'

STRESS / VOM NETZ / 2017-01-12
 

Brain activity is key to why stress increases the risk of heart disease and stroke, a study suggests.

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Iron deficiency anemia associated with hearing loss

WISSENSCHAFT / VOM NETZ / 2016-12-29
 

Medical researchers examined the association between sensorineural hearing loss and conductive hearing loss and iron deficiency anemia in adults ages 21 to 90 years.

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Blood test could predict best treatment for lung cancer

THERAPIE / VOM NETZ / 2016-11-21
 

A blood test could predict how well small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients will respond to treatment, according to new research.

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Study shows health improving globally, but progress is patchy

WISSENSCHAFT / VOM NETZ / 2016-10-06
 

Globally, people's health is improving and life expectancy is rising, but progress is far from universal with chronic diseases bringing long-term illness and causing seven out of 10 deaths, according to research.

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Ignoring a minor stroke ups risk for more strokes soon after

THERAPIE / VOM NETZ / 2016-09-05
 

People who have a minor stroke – or even a mini-stroke - are at serious risk for further strokes in the next few days, but many people delay going to the hospital because they do not recognize the symptoms, researchers warn.

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Virtual reality helps 8 paralyzed people move again

WISSENSCHAFT / VOM NETZ / 2016-08-12
 

Brain training therapy, including virtual reality walking, helped kick-start connections between brain and body

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Whole grain intake tied to longer, healthier life

ERNÄHRUNG / VOM NETZ / 2016-06-15
 

People who eat lots of whole grains are less likely than others to die of cardiovascular disease or cancer during long periods of follow-up, according to a new analysis of previous studies.

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Massage may be option for pain relief

SCHMERZ / VOM NETZ / 2016-05-24
 

Massage is better than nothing for pain relief, according to a new review. The therapy may also be an acceptable choice for people considering other options like acupuncture and physical therapy.

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Nutrient supplements can give antidepressants a boost

ARZNEIMITTEL / VOM NETZ / 2016-04-26
 

An international evidence review has found that certain nutritional supplements can increase the effectiveness of antidepressants for people with clinical depression.

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Blood test can detect concussions even days later

THERAPIE / VOM NETZ / 2016-03-28
 

Researchers say a blood biomarker can confirm that a concussion occurred and may eventually help guide treatment

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Heart attacks could be reduced by rethinking the way we prescribe statins

THERAPIE / VOM NETZ / 2016-03-11
 

Millions of people today take statins to help lower their cholesterol level. Currently statins are prescribed to patients based on their future risk of cardiovascular disease, mainly driven by age, which excludes many individuals who may benefit from them. Researchers have developed a new approach to determine which individuals should receive these important medications. Their findings could improve prevention of heart disease, especially in younger people.

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New insight into the possible risk factors associated with food allergies

ERNÄHRUNG / VOM NETZ / 2016-02-29
 

A new study assessed the prevalence of two different types of food hypersensitivity and the risk factors associated with them.

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Social groups after retirement may be good for longevity

PRÄVENTION / VOM NETZ / 2016-02-16
 

Should retirement planning include strategies for being active in social groups? Perhaps yes, researchers say.

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Researchers uncover how dopamine transports within the brain

WISSENSCHAFT / VOM NETZ / 2016-01-26
 

The mechanics of how dopamine transports into and out of brain cells has been uncovered by researchers, a finding that could someday lead to more effective treatment of drug addictions and neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease.

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Digital eye strain a growing problem

PRÄVENTION / VOM NETZ / 2016-01-07
 

How to reduce the risk of digital eye strain from hours spent staring at computer, smartphone and TV screens.

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How brain architecture leads to abstract thought

WISSENSCHAFT / VOM NETZ / 2015-12-17
 

Using 20 years of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from tens of thousands of brain imaging experiments, computational neuroscientists have created a geometry-based method for massive data analysis to reach a new understanding of how thought arises from brain structure.

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How one gene contributes to two diseases

PSYCHIATRIE / VOM NETZ / 2015-12-11
 

Although it is known that psychiatric disorders have a strong genetic component, untangling the web of genes contributing to each disease is a daunting task. Scientists have found hundreds of genes that are mutated in patients with disorders such as autism, but each patient usually has only a handful of these variations. Now neuroscientists have unraveled Shank3 gene's role in autism and schizophrenia.

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New protein biomarker identifies damaged brain wiring after concussion

THERAPIE / VOM NETZ / 2015-11-23
 

A brain protein called SNTF, which rises in the blood after some concussions, signals the type of brain damage that is thought to be the source of these cognitive impairments.

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Heat-activated ‘grenade’ to target cancer

THERAPIE / VOM NETZ / 2015-11-02
 

Researchers have developed cancer drug-packed ‘grenades’ armed with heat sensitive triggers, allowing for treatment to be targeted directly at tumors, according to two new studies.

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Test could predict whether breast cancer will spread to the brain

WISSENSCHAFT / VOM NETZ / 2015-10-21
 

Women with particularly aggressive forms of breast cancer could be identified by a test that predicts whether the disease is likely to spread to the brain. An analysis of almost 4,000 patients with breast cancer found that testing for high activity in a particular gene could pick out women who were at greater risk of developing secondary brain tumors compared to women who tested negative.

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